Just downloaded James Patterson’s Maximum Ride from my library. Looks pretty interesting. Anyone read it?

Just downloaded James Patterson’s Maximum Ride from my library. Looks pretty interesting. Anyone read it?

Hey everyone! I’ll be releasing the next book in the Fright Files series for kids in the last week of December. It will be called Fright Files: Nightmare New Year. I’ll post here on Tumblr again, or please stop by my website where you can sign up for notifications.

Hey everyone! I’ll be releasing the next book in the Fright Files series for kids in the last week of December. It will be called Fright Files: Nightmare New Year. I’ll post here on Tumblr again, or please stop by my website where you can sign up for notifications.

My assistant Sarubobo went to The Grove today to find out where Stevie Barton fell from the trail in my free novel Fright Files: The Broken Thing. Here’s a picture of what he found.

My assistant Sarubobo went to The Grove today to find out where Stevie Barton fell from the trail in my free novel Fright Files: The Broken Thing. Here’s a picture of what he found.

Pick Your Poison & Last Week’s Game

Poll 2011-11-04 Solution

Above is the solution to last week’s game that was posted over on the Fright Files website. This week, instead of posting a new image for the game, I’ve decided to post a poll. I’m hard at work for the second book in the series, which I hope will be available in the last week of December. For the third book, I wanted to turn to my readers to find out what YOU want.That’s right. You can choose the topic for the third book! Yay, you!

Head on over to my website and vote by making your selection from the poll on the right side. But please, just vote once. And if your favorite fright isn’t listed, drop me a line on the contact form or on my Tumblr and let me know!

psb

INSPIRATION
Now and then I’ll get a friend or family member who reads one of my   stories and wants to know just how messed up I have to be to make up   some of my stuff. They think it comes out of thin air, or from a dream,   or the little voices in my head tell me to do it. While that might be   true for other things, the little voices are decidedly unhelpful when it   comes to the writing.
Sometimes I’ll get some information from life that sets me on a path.   A creepy haunted house in a low budget Japanese amusement park (see   photo), or a conversation with a friend, or maybe even a photograph or   show I see. But more often then not, it’s just hard work and patience.
A building process. I’ll usually have a vague story idea, but it’s   not nearly enough. I’ll take it, and I’ll sit down, and I’ll start   plotting. I’m not one of those writers like Stephen King that just sits   down and starts writing. I need to think it out ahead of time. So I’ll   take an idea and work through an outline as best I can, but it’ll be   junk. It’s like the skeleton of a building under construction. Then I   have to start the next step. Adding good ideas and removing bad. This   goes on for some time until eventually I have a framework for a story.
By doing this, ideas materialize seemingly on their own, and I’ll   find myself smiling or laughing or amazed by how well the pieces have   come together. Of course, sometimes the opposite happens, and I end up   scratching an idea. It’s better to do that up front, though, before the   real writing begins.
!pub

INSPIRATION

Now and then I’ll get a friend or family member who reads one of my stories and wants to know just how messed up I have to be to make up some of my stuff. They think it comes out of thin air, or from a dream, or the little voices in my head tell me to do it. While that might be true for other things, the little voices are decidedly unhelpful when it comes to the writing.

Sometimes I’ll get some information from life that sets me on a path. A creepy haunted house in a low budget Japanese amusement park (see photo), or a conversation with a friend, or maybe even a photograph or show I see. But more often then not, it’s just hard work and patience.

A building process. I’ll usually have a vague story idea, but it’s not nearly enough. I’ll take it, and I’ll sit down, and I’ll start plotting. I’m not one of those writers like Stephen King that just sits down and starts writing. I need to think it out ahead of time. So I’ll take an idea and work through an outline as best I can, but it’ll be junk. It’s like the skeleton of a building under construction. Then I have to start the next step. Adding good ideas and removing bad. This goes on for some time until eventually I have a framework for a story.

By doing this, ideas materialize seemingly on their own, and I’ll find myself smiling or laughing or amazed by how well the pieces have come together. Of course, sometimes the opposite happens, and I end up scratching an idea. It’s better to do that up front, though, before the real writing begins.

!pub

Fright Files: The Broken Thing

Middle-Grade Horror

Ages 9+